Updating bios from dos

17-Feb-2019 16:59 by 4 Comments

Updating bios from dos - dating chinese manchester

BIOSes are computer-specific (or motherboard-specific), so you will need the BIOS for your exact model of computer (or motherboard) to update your computer’s BIOS.

A computer's Basic Input-Output System (BIOS) is embedded software on a motherboard.If you built your own computer, a BIOS update would come from your motherboard vendor.These updates can be “flashed” onto the BIOS chip, replacing the BIOS software the computer came with with a new version of the BIOS.You likely won’t see the difference between the new BIOS version and the old one.In some cases, you may even experience new bugs with a new version of the BIOS, as the BIOS that came with your computer may have gone through more testing.In recent years, things have gotten a whole lot more friendly on the BIOS upgrade front, and markedly more failure resistant too.

It's likely that the major motherboard manufacturers realized that consumers were simply not bothering to update their motherboards due to the complexities involved.In this article PCstats will describe some of the methods you can use to upgrade your computer's BIOS, and explain what a BIOS is, and does.PCstats will also help walk you through the process of locating potential updates, and deciding if you need them.On the other hand, we have previously covered why you shouldn’t generally update your hardware drivers, although gamers will definitely want to update their graphics drivers. BIOS updates will not make your computer faster, they generally won’t add new features you need, and they may even cause additional problems.You should only update your BIOS if the new version contains an improvement you need. When you power your computer on, your BIOS takes control, starting the power-on self test (POST) and passing control over to the boot loader, which boots your computer’s operating system.Unlike your operating system (which is stored on your hard drive), your computer’s BIOS is stored on a chip on your motherboard.