Updating microchip pet information

17-Apr-2019 10:47 by 3 Comments

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IDEs / SDKs / Compilers: What is the manufacturer-suggested IDE for developing code on the MCU? There are more than a dozen compilers / IDEs available for many of these architectures, so I can’t reasonably review all of them.Feel free to express your contempt of my methodology in the comments section.

I wanted to explore the

I wanted to explore the $1 pricing zone specifically because it’s the least amount of money you can spend on an MCU that’s still general-purpose enough to be widely useful in a diverse array of projects.A hobbyist who is uncomfortable with surface-mount soldering may be looking for a legacy DIP package that can be used with breadboards and solder protoboards.Different manufacturers choose packaging options carefully, so before you dive into an architecture for a project, one of the first things to consider is making sure that it’s in a package you actually want to deal with.These MCUs were selected to represent their entire families — or sub-families, depending on the architecture — and in my analysis, I’ll offer some information about the family as a whole.If you want to scroll down and find out who the winner is, don’t bother — there’s really no sense in trying to declare the “king of $1 MCUs” as everyone knows the best microcontroller is the one that best matches your application needs.It would be a massive undertaking to go over every single peripheral on these MCUs, but I’ll focus on the ones that all MCUs have in common, and point out fine-print “gotchas” that datasheets always seem to glance over.

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I wanted to explore the $1 pricing zone specifically because it’s the least amount of money you can spend on an MCU that’s still general-purpose enough to be widely useful in a diverse array of projects.

A hobbyist who is uncomfortable with surface-mount soldering may be looking for a legacy DIP package that can be used with breadboards and solder protoboards.

Different manufacturers choose packaging options carefully, so before you dive into an architecture for a project, one of the first things to consider is making sure that it’s in a package you actually want to deal with.

These MCUs were selected to represent their entire families — or sub-families, depending on the architecture — and in my analysis, I’ll offer some information about the family as a whole.

If you want to scroll down and find out who the winner is, don’t bother — there’s really no sense in trying to declare the “king of $1 MCUs” as everyone knows the best microcontroller is the one that best matches your application needs.

It would be a massive undertaking to go over every single peripheral on these MCUs, but I’ll focus on the ones that all MCUs have in common, and point out fine-print “gotchas” that datasheets always seem to glance over.

pricing zone specifically because it’s the least amount of money you can spend on an MCU that’s still general-purpose enough to be widely useful in a diverse array of projects.A hobbyist who is uncomfortable with surface-mount soldering may be looking for a legacy DIP package that can be used with breadboards and solder protoboards.Different manufacturers choose packaging options carefully, so before you dive into an architecture for a project, one of the first things to consider is making sure that it’s in a package you actually want to deal with.These MCUs were selected to represent their entire families — or sub-families, depending on the architecture — and in my analysis, I’ll offer some information about the family as a whole.If you want to scroll down and find out who the winner is, don’t bother — there’s really no sense in trying to declare the “king of

I wanted to explore the $1 pricing zone specifically because it’s the least amount of money you can spend on an MCU that’s still general-purpose enough to be widely useful in a diverse array of projects.A hobbyist who is uncomfortable with surface-mount soldering may be looking for a legacy DIP package that can be used with breadboards and solder protoboards.Different manufacturers choose packaging options carefully, so before you dive into an architecture for a project, one of the first things to consider is making sure that it’s in a package you actually want to deal with.These MCUs were selected to represent their entire families — or sub-families, depending on the architecture — and in my analysis, I’ll offer some information about the family as a whole.If you want to scroll down and find out who the winner is, don’t bother — there’s really no sense in trying to declare the “king of $1 MCUs” as everyone knows the best microcontroller is the one that best matches your application needs.It would be a massive undertaking to go over every single peripheral on these MCUs, but I’ll focus on the ones that all MCUs have in common, and point out fine-print “gotchas” that datasheets always seem to glance over.

||

I wanted to explore the $1 pricing zone specifically because it’s the least amount of money you can spend on an MCU that’s still general-purpose enough to be widely useful in a diverse array of projects.

A hobbyist who is uncomfortable with surface-mount soldering may be looking for a legacy DIP package that can be used with breadboards and solder protoboards.

Different manufacturers choose packaging options carefully, so before you dive into an architecture for a project, one of the first things to consider is making sure that it’s in a package you actually want to deal with.

These MCUs were selected to represent their entire families — or sub-families, depending on the architecture — and in my analysis, I’ll offer some information about the family as a whole.

If you want to scroll down and find out who the winner is, don’t bother — there’s really no sense in trying to declare the “king of $1 MCUs” as everyone knows the best microcontroller is the one that best matches your application needs.

It would be a massive undertaking to go over every single peripheral on these MCUs, but I’ll focus on the ones that all MCUs have in common, and point out fine-print “gotchas” that datasheets always seem to glance over.

MCUs” as everyone knows the best microcontroller is the one that best matches your application needs.It would be a massive undertaking to go over every single peripheral on these MCUs, but I’ll focus on the ones that all MCUs have in common, and point out fine-print “gotchas” that datasheets always seem to glance over.

Any microcontroller review or selection guide should include a discussion of the overall development environment and experience. These are the sorts of things I’ll be exploring while evaluating the software for the MCU architecture.

As an embedded design consultant, the diverse collection of projects on my desk need an equally-diverse collection of microcontroller architectures that have the performance, peripheral selection, and power numbers to be the backbone of successful projects.

At the same time, we all have our go-to chips — those parts that linger in our toolkit after being picked up in school, through forum posts, or from previous projects.

To get technical: I purchased several different MCUs — all less than a

Any microcontroller review or selection guide should include a discussion of the overall development environment and experience. These are the sorts of things I’ll be exploring while evaluating the software for the MCU architecture.

As an embedded design consultant, the diverse collection of projects on my desk need an equally-diverse collection of microcontroller architectures that have the performance, peripheral selection, and power numbers to be the backbone of successful projects.

At the same time, we all have our go-to chips — those parts that linger in our toolkit after being picked up in school, through forum posts, or from previous projects.

To get technical: I purchased several different MCUs — all less than a $1 — from a wide variety of brands and distributors.

I’m sure people will chime in and either claim that a part is more than a dollar, or that I should have used another part which can be had for less than a dollar.

This routine will obviously also test bit manipulation performance (though this is rarely important in general-purpose projects).

||

Any microcontroller review or selection guide should include a discussion of the overall development environment and experience. These are the sorts of things I’ll be exploring while evaluating the software for the MCU architecture.As an embedded design consultant, the diverse collection of projects on my desk need an equally-diverse collection of microcontroller architectures that have the performance, peripheral selection, and power numbers to be the backbone of successful projects.At the same time, we all have our go-to chips — those parts that linger in our toolkit after being picked up in school, through forum posts, or from previous projects.To get technical: I purchased several different MCUs — all less than a $1 — from a wide variety of brands and distributors.I’m sure people will chime in and either claim that a part is more than a dollar, or that I should have used another part which can be had for less than a dollar.This routine will obviously also test bit manipulation performance (though this is rarely important in general-purpose projects).

— from a wide variety of brands and distributors.

I’m sure people will chime in and either claim that a part is more than a dollar, or that I should have used another part which can be had for less than a dollar.

This routine will obviously also test bit manipulation performance (though this is rarely important in general-purpose projects).